Y.C.W. National Council in Session

Delegates, clerical and lay, are in Melbourne from all parts of Australia to attend the 8th National Council meeting of the Young Christian Workers’ Movement. The Council began with a retreat on Monday, September 8, and will close on Friday, September 12. Archbishop’ Mannix was present on Tuesday afternoon to welcome the delegates and the Episcopal Chairman of the Y.C.W., Archbishop Simonds, attended other sessions. The priests present were: Rev. Father Lombard (National ChapIain and Melbourne Diocesan Chaplain), Rev. Father McLaren (Melbourne Y.C.W.), Very Rev. E. Sullivan, D.D. (Perth Archdiocesan Chaplain), Father B. O’Shea (Brisbane’ Archdiocesan Chaplain), and Diocesan Chaplains from Maitland, Rockhampton and Ballarat in Rev Fathers B. Kennedy, J. Leahy and P. Bohan. Also observing at the Council is Rev. Father B. Lohan, from Canberra-Goulburn Archdiocese. The National President of the Y.C.W. is John Doherty, and the National Secretary is Bill Ginane. Lay delegates include the Archdiocesan and Diocesan Presidents from Perth (Ray Gleeson), Brisbane (Des. Hegarty), Rockhampton (Des. Mealey), and Melbourne (Brian Waldron). Other inter-State visitors are Brian O’Halloran (Brisbane secretary), R. Heffernan, H. Buckley (Ipswich), B. Lambert (Hobart), G. Freeman (Launceston), W. Clegg (Armidale, N.S.W.), A. Levy (Newcastle), B. McPherson (Newcastle), R. Hussey and J. Haskell (Adelaide), R. Phillips (Rockhampton), and L. Callinan (Ballarat).

SOURCE

Y.C.W. National Council in Session (Advocate, Thursday 11 September 1952, page 3) (Trove)

Archbishop Addresses Young Catholic Students

“I AM very grateful for the musical item by the C.L.C. girls, and now you will have to submit to an unmusical item by me,” said his Grace the Archbishop, Most Rev. D. Mannix, addressing a recent conference of Young Catholic Students at Sacre Coeur Convent, Malvern.

“I am, once again, delighted to have the opportunity of associating myself with this section of the lay apostolate. I like to call it the lay apostolate rather than Catholic Action. The title lay apostolate is much more significant and appropriate than Catholic Action, which has been misunderstood and misinterpreted, at all events, in this this country. country.

“I am delighted to find that you continue to make a notable contribution to the lay apostolate. No doubt there have been ups and downs. The best proof of your success is that the lay apostolate has been growing in strength over the years; for the growth of the apostolate is largely due to the fact that the young people at your stage of life are doing their best to lay solid foundations.

“I am grateful to the priests, sisters and brothers who are helping you so much. If the priests, sisters and brothers did not make their zealous contribution, your activities would peter out. I thank the priests, brothers and sisters for their contribution and the young people themselves. We all have much reason to be gratified for what has been done.

“I am much gratified to know that through your influence the number of religious vocations seems to be increasing. Recently, hero in Melbourne, a priest, Father Lyons, has been specially set the work of fostering vocations, and I am sure that you will co-operate with him. I don’t suppose all of you are going to have religious vocations; if you did, the lay apostolate would very soon come to an end. Nevertheless, you are going to make your own big contribution to the religious bodies.

“I hope also that parents, too, will co-operate generously. Sometimes parents can make difficulties in the way of vocations. While parents’ advice should be listened to and taken in the proper spirit, parents have no right to put obstacles in the way of their children’s religious vocations. That is something between the individual and God.

“We are all glad to welcome back Father Chamberlin from his world-wide investigations. I have not heard him speak his mind on how we compare with other places, but I am sure he would say that while we have a good deal to learn from other lands and peoples, we have no reason to be dissatisfied with what has been done here.

“Once again, I wish to express my gratitude and indebtedness to you. I ask God to continue to bless your movement and enlarge your activities so that His cause will advance in and through the Catholic Church in Australia.”

SOURCE

Archbishop Addresses Young Catholic Students (Advocate, Thursday 15 May 1952, page 8) / Trove

Archbishop Opens Y.C.W. Camp

New Venture at Phillip Island

HE Y.C;W. Movement’s permanent camp at Phillip Island T was blessed and opened on Wednesday, January 2, by his Grace the Archbishop, Most Rev. D. Mannix. Accompanying his Grace were Bishop Vesters, M.S.G., and Rev. L. Moran. His Grace was received on arrival at the camp by Rev. F. Lombard (Diocesan Y.C.W. chaplain) and Rev. D. Cameron. Some 300 people, , including many priests and students from Corpus Christi College, Werribee, were present for the ceremony. The 28-acre camp site is beautifully situated on Smith’s JBeach. The opening was favoured with a perfect summer’s day. To date, the Y.C.W. Patriotic Committee has completed one building on the site. It contains a 24-bunk dormitory, a kitchen and mess room. Further improvements to the site are

planned for early this year. These include levelling of part of the grounds to provide a variety of sporting facilities. From Boxing Day till January 5, 100 young workers enjoyed a splendid holiday at the camp. Rev. D. Cameron of Elsternwick was camp chaplain, whilst Dan Callahan was camp organizer. Ten ecclesiastical students from Corpus Christi College, Werribee, had an enjoyable stay at the camp. The main purpose of the Y.C.W. in establishing its own permanent camp is to provide working youth with the facility to have a reasonably priced holiday in excellent conditions and under good management. Large numbers will

be taken at the camp on holidays; and the camp will be available every week-end for parish groups of young workers or schoolboys. The purchase of the camp and its development have been made possible by the efforts of the Y.C.W. Men’s Extension Committee, which raised money through Y.C.W. Patriotic Funds raffles. As a result, sons and brothers of exservicemen will be able to enjoy the benefits of a first-rate camp. His Grace was welcomed by Mr. Ted Long on behalf of the Y.C.W.; and by Cr. West on behalf of the Shire of Phillip Island. Mr. P. J. Mitchell, of the Y.C.W. Men’s Extension Committee thanked his Grace for his interest in coming so far to open the camp. Present amongst the priests were Rev. Fathers E. Murtagh, P.P.; E. A. F6nnessy, P.P.; J. Ryan, P.P.; F. W. Lombard, L.

Moran, D. Cameron, J. O’Keefe, J. F. Kelly, V. Arthur, K. Ryan, T. Brophy, J. O’Shea, J. Spillane, L. Ryan, F. Larsen and Dr. H. Jordan, M.S.C. ARCHBISHOP’S ADDRESS His Grace the Archbishop in opening and blessing the camp, said that he had heard about the pimp project and knew that building had commenced but had no idea that so much progress had been made. Great work had already been done in developing the beautiful site. His Grace said that it was a pleasure for him to open yet another Y.C.W. venture. The camp was, of course, only one aspect of the work of the Young Christian Workers, which in its 10 years’ existence had done so much for the youth of Australia. He was confident that the camp, like other Y.C.W. ventures, would succeed. The camp should do much good in the years to come in providing recreation for youth. Young men could come to the camp and enjoy the simple life—about which we heard so much and few seemed to practise. The camp was a credit to the Y.C.W. and to Father Lombard’s initiative and vision. His Grace congratulated Father Lombard and thanked him for all he had done for the Y.C.W. in Melbourne and throughout Australia. Thanks were due also, his Grace said, to all who were associated with Father Lombard in the work. The Y.C.W. was fortunate in having helpers who remained constant. The object of the Y.C.W. was the lifting of morale among youth. While other people talked vaguely about morale the Y.C.W. had done something practical about it and had already achieved a great deal. If we were to improve morale each one had a responsibility to be land to others, patient, sober, honest and develop all die virtues. The Y.C.W. was helping to do this and to influence others and in this way was trying to change the environment for youth. God had His way of saving the world, but He would not give us victory without our co-operation. The following donations were received” during the day: £10/10/-, Mrs. K. House; £10, Mr. T. Mooney; £7/7/-, Mrs. P. O’Loughlin; £5/5/-, Rev. J. O’Keefe, Rev. J. L. Ryan, Mr. D. M. Lombard; £5, Mrs. Clarke, “Anonymous”; £2, Mrs. McCann; £1/1/-, Cr. West, Mr. D. Mc-Adie, Mrs. Larsen, Mrs. E. Owens, Mr. C. J. Corrigan, Miss Berger, Miss N. Fairbanks; £1, Mr. K. McCann, Mr. Thornton Smith; 10/-, Mr. R. Myler, Mrs. Allen, Mr. Shields, Mrs. Ryan, Misses E. and P. Kelly, Mr.Stppa, “Anonymous” (two).

SOURCE

Advocate (Melbourne, Vic. : 1868 – 1954), Thursday 10 January 1952, page 7

Ten Years of the Y.C.W. Movement in Melbourne

7th National Conference Opens in Brisbane on Sunday Under the presidency of his Grace Archbishop Simonds, Episcopal Chairman of the Young Christian Workers, a hundred lay-leaders and priest-chaplains from all parts of Australia will meet in Brisbane next Sunday for the opening of the seventh national conference (September 9-15).

To commemorate the tenth anniversary of the foundation of the movement in Australia, his Holiness Pope Pius XII is sending a special message and a recorded message has been received from Monsignor Cardijn, founder of the J.O.C. The main address at the conference will be given by Archbishop Simonds.

THE Young Christian Workers’ Movement on September 8, Our Lady’s birthday, celebrates the tenth birthday of its foundation in Australia. On September 8, 1941, the Young Christian Workers’ Movement received official mandate for Catholic Action from his Grace Archbishop Mannix.

From the very beginning, the Y.C.W. directed its efforts to the formation of leaders who would be truly apostolic. As early as Christmas, 1940, before the actual formation of the movement, an experimental leaders’ training camp was held at Mornington. The second leaders’ camp was held at Hanging Rock in Easter, 1942.

This work received a tremendous boost in 1943 when the Y.C.W. acquired its first property—a leadership training centre “Maiya Wamba” (House of Youth) occupying nine acres at Cheltenham. Since then, approximately twenty-five leaders from throughout the archdiocese have been in training at “Maiya Wamba” each week-end.

The purchasing of this property during the war and at a time when the Y.C.W. was having a battle to build up a stable organization was a sign of courageous confidence in the future of the movement.

The raising of the necessary finance for this venture was largely due to the efforts of the Melbourne Y.C.W. Men’s Extension Committee. This committee had originally been formed in 1942 to assist in the organization of the Xavier Youth Rally.

Mr. Frank Murphy was its first honorary secretary. Mr. Bernard Foley later became the full-time secretary of this committee. In 1947, Mr. Reuben Quirk succeeded him in this position.

Since their inception, both the men’s and ladies’ extension committees have made tremendous efforts to raise finance necessary for many of the Y.C.W.’s projects—including the purchase of the Albert Park Y.C.W. Hostel for underprivileged youth, the Hawthorn Y.C.W. Migration Hostel, and the staging of the Xavier youth rallies. This committee has so far raised over £100,000.

NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

While these activities were taking place in Melbourne, the Y.C.W. had been spreading to other dioceses throughout Australia. In 1943 the Episcopal Committee of Catholic Action made it a National Movement and appointed his Grace, Most Rev. J. D. Simonds, D.D., Ph.D., as episcopal chairman.This was a historic year for the Y.C.W., as in addition to the

development previously mentioned, it was the occasion of the first national meeting of the Y.C.W. chaplains. On this occasion 110 priests from all over Australia were in conference for two days at the Convent of the Good Shepherd, Abbotsford. Largely due to the inspiration of his Grace, Dr. Simonds, this meeting was a huge success.

In 1943 the Y.C.W. in Australia appointed its first full-time worker; Frank McCann, now secretary-manager of the Y.C.W. Co-operative Trading Society, was appointed as national secretary by the episcopal chairman. The following year a preliminary national conference of chaplains and leaders was held at “Maiya Wamba.”

The first full-scale national conference was held at Brisbane in 1945. One hundred leaders and sixty chaplains from all over Australia were present, and his Grace Dr. Simonds presided. Subsequent national conferences have been held in Newcastle, Adelaide, Melbourne and Perth. In June, 1947, a great Y.C.W. international conference, was held in Montreal, Canada, to mark the fifteenth birthday of the Y.C.W. in that country, 42 countries were represented.

Ted Long, Melbourne diocesan secretary, and a member of the national executive, was seint to represent the Australian Y.C.W. at the conference.

It was as a result of ideas brought back from this conference that the Pre-Cana Conferences for engaged couples were started later in the same year. Since then the Pre-Cana Movement has spread throughout Australia. Some thousands of engaged couples have availed themselves of this tremendously important service since its inception.

In 1948 Frank McCann, national secretary, was sent by the Australian Government as a representative to an international youth conference in London. While Frank was in England the information he gained of the English Y.C.W. proved a great assistance to the movement when he returned.

In 1949 Frank McCann retired as national secretary to take over as secretary of the Y.C.W. Cooperative Trading Society in Melbourne. Terry Barker, who had been a full-time Y.C.W. national field-officer since 1947, was appointed national secretary in May, 1949.

In 1950 Terry Barker attended an international Y.C.W. conference in Brussels to mark the’ silver jubilee of the Y.C.W. The same year, the national chaplain, Rev. Father Lombard, returned to Australia after having studied youth and migration problems in the countries overseas at the request of the Australian Government.

NEW YOUTH

Right from the beginning of the national movement in 1943, the Y.C.W. realized the need for publishing a newspaper which would be the voice of the movement in bringing Christian values to the young worker and the public in general. New Youth, a monthly paper, was first published in 1943. The appointment of Ken Treacey as full-time editor of New Youth in 1948 was immediately reflected in the standard of the paper.

The Y.C.W. is immensely grateful for the assistance and advice given New Youth at the time by the late Alan Powell, a prominent journalist on a leading Melbourne daily. David Burke succeeded Ken Treacey in February, 1949, until .February, 1951, and further improved the quality and standing of the paper.

LATER MELBOURNE DEVELOPMENTS

Since Father Lombard s appointment as full-time Melbourne chaplain in 1944, and the appointment of Ken Treacey as fulltime Melbourne secretary in 1945, the Y.C.W. progressed rapidly in the archdiocese. Ted Long, who had been acting national secretary while Frank McCann was ill, became Melbourne secretary when Ken Treacey was appointed editor of New Youth in 1946. Noel Murphy, Frank Quinn and Bill Davies increased the Melbourne staff and led to a further expansion of services.

In 1946, the Y.C.W, acquired a hostel at Albert Park for under privileged youth. This hostel was later extended and accommodates 22 youths from St. Augustine’s Orphanage with Rev. Colin Miller as resident chaplain. In the same year, 1946, the first Y.C.W. Co-Operative Housing Society was registered. This has developed until at the present time, the Housing Co-Operative have a guaranteed capital of £3,000,000 and 2260 members; 720 homes have already been completed. In 1947 the Y.C.W. established an accommodation bureau as well as an apprenticeship and employment advisory bureau. These services did much to meet some of the major current problems of youth in Melbourne.

The Y.C.W. Migration Hostel at Hawthorn for young worker migrants from the British Isles was first purchased in 1948. The first batch of 34 migrants arrived in 1950. Regular batches of young workers from overseas have been arriving since that time. Rev. J. A. Carroll is resident chaplain at the migration hostel Another important development was the. purchase of a 25-acre property at Phillip Island in 1949 as a permanent camp-site for young workers.

Also in 1949 the Y.C.W. Co-Operative Trading Society was formed with Frank McCann as secretary. Since then 500 young families have obtained their home furnishings from this society on a co-operative basis.

The years 1949 and 1950 saw a considerable change-over of staff at Melbourne headquarters. Frank Quinn in 1949 was succeeded by Peter O’Donnell. In 1950 Dan Callahan and Ivor Davis joined the staff, replacing Ted Long, Noel Murphy and Bill Davies, who took up other positions, but continued to assist the development of the movement. Ted Long who joined the staff of the housing co-operatives, has recently returned to the Melbourne staff. Peter O’Donnell, who joined the Redemptorist Order, and Ivor Davis later left the staff in 1950.

The present fulltime workers at Melbourne headquarters are Ted Long, Dan Callahan, Bill Bainbridge, Bill Ginnane and Peter Kelly.

Rev. Father F. W. Lombard, National Chaplain, Australian Y.C.W., with Monsignor J. Cardijn, founder of the Y.C.W.

SOURCE

Ten Years of the Y.C.W. Movement in Melbourne (Thursday 6 September 1951, page 8) (Trove)

Opening of YCW Youth Hostel extension

The official opening of the new extension to the Y.C.W. Hostel for underprivileged youths at l/l Beaconsfield-parade, Albert Park will take place at 3 pan. on Sunday October 23, by his Grace the Archbishop, Most Rev.” D. Mannix. • Visitors will include priests from various parishes, Mr. J. L. Cremean, M.L.A., the Mayor of South Melbourne, Cr H. A. Layfield, councillors from South Melbourne and Port Melbourne, and members of the Y.C.W. Men s Extension Committee. Mr. P. J. Mitchell will be chairman.

SOURCE

OPENING OF Y.C.W. YOUTH HOSTEL EXTENSION

Advocate (Melbourne, Vic. : 1868 – 1954), Thursday 20 October 1949, page 22

None May Refuse Support to Catholic Action

Archbishop’s Urgent Statement at Christian Workers’ Conference

SPEAKING to the large gathering of men at the — National Christian Workers’ Movement annual conference at Sunshine Parish Hall on Sunday, September 28, his Grace the Archbishop quoted a recent utterance of the Holy Father. The Pope was addressing the Catholic Young Women’s Federation in Rome and he said: ” ‘Abstention from active work for God and for Christ in the present condition in Europe, you must know full well is in itself a grave sin of omission.’ These are very strong words coming from the Pope, dealing with a situation like our own,”‘ said Dr. ‘Mannix. “We have substantially and practically the very same pagan atmosphere to fight, and the very same problems to solve, and I have no doubt if the Pope were standing here, he would say the very same thing to you.”

The theme of the conference was “The Home,” which was considered under three heads, “Christian Marriage.” “Parents and Children” and “The Family Unit and Society.” the three rriain speakers being Rev. M. Caterinich, Sir Henry Digby-Beste and Mr. W. McMahon.

Mr. W. O’Keefe, diocesan president of the N.C.W.M., was in the chair and amongst those present were Revs. W. P. Hackett, S.J.; J. Ciantar. S.C.; M. Brosnan, B.A., PP.; C. Mayne, S.J.; B. Kennedy, B. M. Day and L. Egan.

In his address of welcome to the Archbishop the parish priest of Sunshine, Fr. Ryder, said that according to the reports of those who had been overseas Catholic Action in Australia could compare favourably with any other part of the world. Whatever success we had had here was in very large measure due to the wise guidance and wonderful sunport that Dr. Mannix had given it. Under present condition^, he said, none could hold back and refuse their full support to Catholic Action.

ANNUAL REPORT

In his annual report the diocesan secretary, Mr. T. Cushen, said that the progress during the past 12 months had been very satisfactory. Membership had risen and there were now more than 1000 members in the N.C.W.M. in the Melbourne Archdiocese. Services and activities were growing and the spirit of the movement was at a very high level. Groups at West Brunswick and West Footscray had formed branches during the year. The former, although it had been in existence for only six months, already had over 90 members^ and was one of the most successful branches in the movement.

Groups were in process of formation at East Brunswick, Ascot Vale, Flemington and Castlemaine.

The two N.C.W.M. Co-operative Housing Societies had held their first annual general meetings in September and their reports were most satisfactory. There were approximately 60 members in the 22-year society and 126 in the 30-year society. Altogether, 40 members had started to build homes. Their applications for loans totalling about £46,000 had been granted, and four houses were completed and occupied.

Other services reported on were credit union, vocational guidance and employment bureaux, handy-man service, cooperative buying clubs and advice on taxation, gardening, social services and various other practical problems in the lives of adult workers.

A complete new training programme incorporating all the latest developments in Catholic Action was in course of preparation and would soon be ready. When it was, a new drive for branches, both within and outside the Archdiocese, Would be made.

PLANS FOR THE FUTURE

Outlining the plans for the future, the national secretary of the movement, Mr. K. W. Mitchell, said that although great success had been achieved by the N.C.W.M,, until recently two problems had worried the executive and the leaders’ groups. Firstly, though there was great loyalty and enthusiasm amongst the ordinary members, there was no organised apostolic work undertaken by them, and it was of the essence of Catholic Action that every person who joined its army should become an active apostle. Secondly, there had not been, so far, any organised and systematised attack on the environment itself—in the factories, workshops and offices, in the homes arid the various places where men spent their leisure time.

The executive had now devised a plan which it felt confident would provide the solution to these two problems. Every, leader in the movement was asked to form a sub-leaders’ group comprising four or five members of his branch who lived in his immediate neighbourhood. The members of these sub-groups would, on the one hand, assist in the running of the branch and gradually take off the leaders’ shoulders all the organising and a d m i n i strative responsibility; and, on the other hand, would endeavour to form “teams of influence” in the environment through which they would spread the ideas of the movement and endeavour to Christianise the various spheres of -the work, the home and the leisure in which they spent their daily lives. Mr. Mitchell strongly urged all members to back up this plan and to develop and extend their apostolic activity so that the ultimate objective of the N.C.W.M., the Christianising of the whole environment of the workers, might be achieved.

In a stirring appeal for action, Rev. W. Hackett, S.J., said that the time for words had passed and it was now up to us to do sromething. Australians were altogether too apathetic, and if they did not bestir themselves now the country might well be plunged into the dreadful chaos that we had witnessed in Europe followed by the oppression of totalitarianism.

THE ARCHBISHOP’S ADDRESS

“If I could be carried away,” said his Grace the Archbishop, “I should have been carried away by that passionate address just delivered by Fr. Hackett. Everything that he said was something you have to take to heart, and the appeal that he made to you, in such eloquent and passionate language, is really the appeal that I have been making, much more feebly, for many years—not altogether without result—but now that the real Catholic Actionists have come into line with Fr. Hackett and Mr. Mitchell and others, I am looking forward to great strides in Catholic Action in the near future.

“When I listened to Mr. Mitchell explaining this new system, which apparently has been hatched between himself and Fr. Mayne, I think it has in it a great element of hope and progress. It is nothing very wonderful that any individual is asked to undertake, but everybody is asked to undertake something. Everybody can do something, and everybody make his own contribution. This scheme now put before you will yield very valuable results in the near, future.

“Another thing that occurred to me was that Fr. Mayne and Mr. Mitchell might seem to be making big demands upon you, but we are not asking you to do anything that the Communists are not doing already, and doing with marvellous results—from their point of view. They have no difficulty about spending their time and devoting their energy to the promotion of their own particular objective, and if only we are as much interested in Christ’s cause as they are in the cause of the Evil One, there ought to be progress on our side, and I have great hopes that you who have done so much already, will, under the direction of those who are leading you, do even greater things in the future. I am very proud of what you have done. I know that you have made considerable sacrifices (not greater than the Communists have made for their objective), but I give you credit for all that you have done, and I have great hopes that you will do even better things in the future.

“I am glad to know that your members are increasing — not rapidly, but with continued progress. There is no falling off. Though the progress may be slow, still it is sure and stable, and you have, needless for me to say, much work to do if you are going to Christianise Australia.

Sad Plight

“We are in a very sad plight at the present time. There is very little Christianity in Australia. There is very little goodness in the world. We are, perhaps, too strong in our pronouncements on the wickedness of the world. There is some goodness, but it is mostly humanitarianism. It is not Christianity and it is for you to try and make any goodness there is in the Australian world — not merely humanitarian, but real Christianity. You are going to succeed if you will put your shoulders to the wheel and keep at it. Do not be afraid because you are not making rapid progress—even though things go awry or amiss, and something on which you have great hones turns out to be a failure. We must have failures if we are to succeed. Of course, we here in Australia are not the only people fighting this battle for Christ. Europe is even in a much worse condition than Australia. I don’t know that any part of Europe is more pagan than Australia, but they have many difficulties there from which we are free. Nobody rpq]icps that and the sad state of Europe better than the Holy Father, and he is looking out over Europe and honing that Catholics will do their duty. The Pope was reported recently to have said, in hi= address to the Catholic Young Women’s Federation in Rome, regarding the grave situation in Europe: ‘Abstention from active work for God and for Christ in the present conditions in Europe, you all know full well is in itself a grave sin of omission.’

Strong Words

“These are very strong words coming from the Pone, dealing with a situation like our own. We have substantially and practically the very same pagan atmosphere to fight, and the very same problems to solve, and I have no doubt if the Pope were standing here, he would say the very same thing to you. He would say that seeing the problems that Australia now has to face; seeing the menace of paganism and Communism,* that the man or the woman. who stands aside and fail£ to do his or her duty to shoulder his or her responsibility, is guilty of a grave omission. I am sure you will take that to heart.

“All you wanted was a lead, and very likely you have every justification for blaming your leaders. If you like you can blame the Bishops of Australia. Perhaps the call was not sufficiently urgent; perhaps the call was not eloquently supported. At all events, you can blame anyone you like—me especially—but we must now face the facts as we find them. We are face to face with atheistic Communism in Australia, and what happened elsewhere can happen here; unless we do our best, Communistic atheism will gain a victory, and it may be a losing victory, in Australia.

“You yourselves are fathers of families, or have young brothers and sisters. You couldn’t do anything better than to use all your energy in doing all you can for the young people” of Australia. You would be following the example of the Communists, but you are trying to lead youth to Christ—they are trying to lead youth away from Him.

“You have wise leadership. I am glad to hear from your leaders that you are prepared to co-operate with them so zealously. If you get the lead, you are prepared to follow. Leaders or followers, the one thing that we must always remember is that unless the Lord bless them that labour, they labour in vain. We have to put all our confidence in God. We must try and make our own lives good Christian lives before we can make Christians of those around us. Try and make ourselves real, genuine Christians, not afraid to stand up for our Faith and follow Christ.

“I hope that God’s blessing in great abundance will rain upon your leaders and yourselves, and through them, and through you, that the menace of Communism in Australia may be stayed and rolled back, and that Australia may be saved from the fate that has fallen upon so many other nations.”

***

His Grace Archbishop Mannix carrying the Blessed Sacrament . in the procession through the Cathedral grounds at the close of the Forty Hours’ devotion, Sunday, October 5.

SOURCE

None May Refuse Support to Catholic Action (Advocate (Melbourne, Vic. : 1868 – 1954), Wednesday 15 October 1947, page 19) (Trove)

Widespread Growth of Australian Y.C.W.

Second Annual Conference Reveals Remarkable Progress

THE success of this conference has exceeded my most optimistic anticipations,” said the Episcopal Chairman of the Young Christian Workers’ Movement, his Grace the Most Rev. Dr. J. D. Simonds, in his concluding address to those present at the 1945 Australian Y.CAV. National Conference.

This conference — the second annual conference of the Australian Y.C.W. chaplains and leaders—was held in Brisbane, at the kind invitation of the Archbishop of Brisbane (Most Rev. Dr. J. Duhig), from August 21 to 24. The conference was held in the main hall of All Hallows’ Convent, Brisbane.

13 DIOCESES REPRESENTED

The attendance of priests and Y.C.W. leaders was impressive. The 100 leaders and 60 priests present were representative of the following 13 dioceses of Australia—Cairns, Townsville, Rockhampton, Toowoomba, Brisbane, Armidale, Maitland, Sydney, Wagga, Sandhurst, Melbourne, Ballarat and Port Augusta.

PROGRAMME

Although the conference occupied only three days (Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday) the whole week was devoted to special Y.C.W. activity. Features were:

Sunday, August 19.—One-day retreat for Y.C.W. leaders at the Marist Fathers’ Monastery, Ashgrove. 100 leaders made the retreat, which was splendidly conducted by Rev. V. Arthur, of St. Michael’s, North Melbourne.

Archbishop’s Welcome to Y.C.W. Visitors.—On Monday night in the Brisbane Leader Hall, his Grace the Most Rev. J. Duhig, publicly welcomed Dr. Simonds, the visiting clergy and Y.C.W. leaders to Brisbane. In heartily welcoming the visitors, Dr. Duhig said here in Australia both the nation and the Church needed youth, and he was sure that- youth would not fail them.

He had seen the Y.C.W. Movement and leaders in action in Melbourne and had been impressed. He felt sure the conference would be a landmark in the history of the Church in Australia. Dr. Duhig was eloquently supported by Mgr. English (Vicar General) and Justices N. Macrossan and E. A. Douglas. Dr. Simonds, Rev. F. Lombard (chaplain, Melbourne Y.C.W.), Frank’ McCann (National Secretary of the Y.C.W.) and Frank McClean (Townsville Y.C.W. President) responded on behalf of the visitors. During his address, Dr. Simonds gave an inspiring explanation of Catholic Action and of .the Y.C.W. Movement’s part in it. He pointed out that Catholic Action was as old as the Church. “It was not the Popes,” he said, “who opened the priesthood to the laity—it was Christ. The Popes have merely reminded us of that fact. The Y.C.W. must begin in the parishes; first with small numbers of leaders who would be trained in the technique of the movement. The Y.C.W. was an apostolic movement—an official sharing in the Bishop’s apostolate.”

THE CONFERENCE

Holy Mass was celebrated by Rev. F. W. Lombard in All Hallows’ Hall at 9.30 a.m. on Tuesday, August 21, to mark the opening of the conference. At the conclusion of Mass Dr. Simonds, who presided throughout the conference, delivered his opening address. Congratulating priests and leaders on the zeal which had brought them to Brisbane for this important conference, Dr. Simonds also reminded them that the Sacrament of Baptism enabled us to share in the life of Christ and therefore in the priesthood of Christ. Confirmation added to this sharing in the priesthood of Christ.

The priests and leaders had separate conferences on the Tuesday. The following papers were read to the priests: “The Choice of Leaders,” by Rev. R. Walton (Toowoomba); “Spiritual Formation,” by Rev. D. J. Stewart (Townsville); “The Gospel Meditation,” by Rev. A. Tynan (Brisbane).

The leaders heard and discussed these papers: “Leaders’ Group Organisation,” John Maguire (Camberwell); “General Branch Organisation,” Ted Long (Melbourne); “Diocesan and National Control,” Frank McCann (National Secretary). On Wednesday and Thursday, priests and leaders met in. general conference and the following papers were submitted to them: “Contact and Influence,” by Don McKenna (Brisbane president); “The General Enquiry,” by Ted Long (Melbourne secretary); “Services,” by Frank McCann (national secretary); “Vocational Groups,” by Rev. J. Mclnerney (Melbourne); “Rehabilitation,” by Rev. F. W. Lombard (Melbourne Diocesan Chaplain). Each paper was followed by discussions among small groups and in this way many useful suggestions were forthcoming when group leaders reported back to the general assembly. The conference was brought to a close with a summary of the proceedings by Dr. Simonds. His Grace thanked everyone present for their zealous co-operation and the hard work they had put into the conference. He also expressed pleasure at the outstanding success of the conference, which had exceeded his most optimistic anticipations.

PROVISIONAL COMMITTEE NATIONAL MEETS

Thursday afternoon and Friday were devoted to a meeting of the Provisional National Committee. The committee, which is only a provisional one, is, for the present, appointed by the Episcopal Chairman and consists of representatives from each diocese where the Y.C.W. is established. The national secretary’s report revealed the continuous growth and development of the movement throughout Australia. The movement now has groups in 20 Catholic dioceses in Australia; has a membership of ten thousand and can claim 1000 leaders partly or fully trained. Reports were submitted by representatives of other dioceses represented, and they showed favourable progress.

A large agenda was gone through by the committee on a variety of items, including the 1946 national programme for the Y.C.W.; consolidation of leadership training; extension of services; assistance in industry and rehabilitation; inter-diocesan relationships and the next annual conference. At the conclusion of the meeting a vote of thanks to his Grace Dr. Simonds for his invaluable service as chairman of the conference and committee was carried with warm acclamation, on the motion of Rev. D. J. Stewart (Townsville), seconded by Ted Long (Melbourne).

RALLY

On the Thursday night, 300 members of the Y.C.W. and N.C.G.M. of Brisbane attended a rally which commenced with devotions and Pontifical Benediction in the Holy Name Crypt, Brisbane. His Grace Dr. Duhig addressed the youth and called on them to accept the challenge to serve God gloriously in and through their youth. Later, the youth were entertained in the Leader Hall by a showing of a Melbourne Y.C.W. film and a short concert programme.

It can be safely said that the Y.C.W. representatives came to Brisbane for the definite purpose of helping to propagate the movement in Australia, Many priests and leaders had come at heavy personal sacrifice; they did it willingly that they might assist the conference—contribute to it what they could and take from it what would help them in the work of their apostolate.

Leaders who had met previously only in correspondence are now personal friends, brought closer together in their common work of forming a new youth to build a new Australia. By now, the great and historic gathering at Brisbane has dispersed and the leaders who were there are back at their normal daily work again, a work in which they will live and spread Christ.

Most Rev. J. D. Simonds, D.D., Ph.D., Episcopal Chairman of Y.C.W., with delegates to the National Conference of the movement, recently held at Brisbane.

SOURCE

Widespread Growth of Australian Y.C.W. (Advocate, Wednesday 5 September 1945, page 8) (Trove)

Power House Of Christian Youth

Y.C.W. Training Centre Opened By Archbishop

“I TAKE a deep interest in the movement, and I would be quite unworthy of my position if I did not realise its value. I have no misgivings about its prospects of great success.” This was stated by his Grace the Archbishop in opening “Maiya Wamba,” the training centre of the Y.C.W. movement, in Weatherall-road, Cheltenham, on Sunday last.

“I can assure you that you could not have given me a better birthday present than to give me the opportunity of coming to this function and formally open ‘Maiya Wamba,’” said his Grace. “We are greatly privileged in having with us to-day the Bishop of Kimberley. I know he was anxious to be here, but it looked as if he would be now on his way to his distant diocese. However, Providence intervened, and he lost his place on the ’plane. In consequence, he was able to avail himself of the opportunity to be with us to-day. These buildings have already been blessed and, as it were, baptized, and this is the day of their Confirmation. They have been given the aboriginal name of ‘Maiya Wamba,’ and it is very appropriate on the day of Confirmation of this institute that we should have the Bishop of the aboriginals here. I am delighted that an aboriginal name was selected for this institution. To my mind ‘Maiya Wamba’ is a musical and very appropriate name.

Tribute to Archbishop Simonds and Fr. Lombard

“I am sorry,” added his Grace, “that Archbishop Simonds is not here to-day because this movement owes a great deal to him. I know he is most deeply interested in the Y.C.W.M. and that his hopes for the future of Australia are largely, if not almost wholly, centred in the movement. I regret that circumstances do not permit him to be here, but I am sure he is with us in spirit, and he has made a notable contribution to the funds. “Nobody has done more for the movement than Fr. Lombard, who is really its father in Melbourne. His enthusiasm and indefatigable zeal have already carried him a long way. I would ask his executive committee to spare him as much as possible and not to make more use of him than could be reasonably expected. I am delighted to avail myself of the opportunity on this occasion to return him my most grateful thanks for what he has done for the youth of Melbourne, and, by his example, I hope, for the youth of the whole of Australia. It is a pleasure to me to do whatever I can to assist this movement. I hope it will increase in usefulness in the years to come and that it will be a backbone to Catholicity and Christianity in Australia.

Time for Action

“I need not dwell upon the need of the movement. Fr. Lombard and other speakers have already dealt with this aspect, and the time for talking about it is really over. It is the time now for doing things. You are asked to put your hands to the plough, and I know you are not going to look back. There is a heavy responsibility on the movement I know the generosity of the Melbourne people. They have never been known to fail, and they are not going to fail to support this admirable institution. The contributions that have already come in show that the appeal has touched the hearts of the people. Collections were also taken up to-day in the various churches, and I am confident when the amounts are made known that Fr. Lombard and his committee, who have given such notable assistance, will have easy minds and consciences. I congratulate Fr. Lombard, and I thank, in a special way, the laymen who came to his help and urged him to go forward and not trouble about finances. I know that the people of Melbourne can be relied on to meet the financial responsibilities, and the institution will be able to face the future without being hampered by a heavy debt. I thank all those who nave helped this movement, and I also thank those who have come here to-day in such splendid numbers to show sympathy with the movement and to inspect this splendid property. I hope your sympathy will never lessen, and that this great institution, where youths will be trained for their important work, will fulfil our highest hopes and expectations. May the Confirmation of ‘Maiya Wamba’ to-day be a memorable event in the history of the Y.C.W. movement.”

POWER HOUSE OF YOUTH

Rev. F. Lombard, P.P., said he hoped his Grace would be spared to be with them for many years. There was no diocese in Australia where the interests of youth received greater consideration than in the Archdiocese of Melbourne. “Maiya Wamba” was a power house to infuse a Christ-like spirit amongst Australian youth, and it was the Church’s answer to the problem of youth. He believed that present-day youths were just as good as youths of the past, but they had to face graver difficulties. In the workshops and factories religion was belittled, and many youths failed to stand up against the forces surrounding them. It was necessary that boys and girls should be specially trained to face the difficulties, and the Y.C.W. movement had been set up to enable boys to lead Christian lives.

Taking the Offensive

It was a movement of action and attacked the evil. Youth movements had been very successful in France, Belgium, England and Ireland, and he was confident that the Y.C.W. movement would be equally successful in Melbourne. At “Maiya Wamba” leaders, would be trained, and they would study the problems of daily life. The purpose of the movement was to make youths see that Our Blessed Lord was a Leader beyond all other leaders, and to implant in their minds the need for spreading the principles of Christ. Already some 200 boys had had a course of instruction at the Home. The cost of the building and 10 acres was £5000, and, in furnishings and improvements, from £1500 to £2000 was spent. He hoped that a generous response would be made to the appeal for funds. It meant much for the Church in Australia to make the movement a great success. Already £1400 or £1500 had been subscribed, and be hoped that the amount would be increased to £2000 by that day’s appeal. In addition, special collections were to come from the various churches. A long subscription list was afterwards read, and among the donors were Archbishop Mannix, £100, and Archbishop Simonds, £10. The day’s collection exceeded £1000. Other speakers were Mr. L. McLennan, chairman of the committee; Bishop Raible, P.S.M.; Mr. E. Long, president of the Y.C.W. movement; Mr. Field, M.L.A.; and the Mayor of Moorabbin. Apologies for inability to be present were received from Archbishop Simonds, Hon. A. A. Calwell (Minister for Information), Hon. I. Macfarlan, K.C., and Mr. H. M. Cremean, M.L.A. A vote of thanks to his Grace was carried with acclamation at the instance of Mr. P. J. Mitchell, seconded by Mr. C. Clements. A guard of honour was furnished by 1500 Young Christian Workers, who displayed their fine standards. The property, which has spacious grounds, was inspected by the large assembly, and favourable comments were made on its situation and its suitableness for training work. At the close of the speech-making, Solemn Benediction was given in the open by Bishop Raible.

Among those present together with his Grace the Archbishop and Bishop Raible were Very Rev. J. M. Murphy, S.J.; Very Rev. J. Meagher, S.J.; Very Rev. T. Considine, S.J.; Very Rev. J. Ciantar, S.C.; Very Rev. H. Bakker, P.P.; Rev. Frs. A. J. Martin, Cullinan, (S.A.), Lande, G. and N. Coughlan, O’Donnell, Arthur, Hunter, J. O’Rorke, O.P.; Aquinas, O.F.M.; Vill and Kupke, P.S.M.; Dorias, S.S.S.; T. Daly, J. A. Kelly, O’Neill, English, Catarinich, D. Coakley, Hardy, J. F. Kelly, J. Perkins, Rovira, Dando, S.J.; Hannan, Sullivan; Rev. Bro. Jerome; Messrs. Field and Mullins, M’s.L.A., and the Mayor of Moorabbin. Before the opening ceremony selections were played by St. Vincent de Paul’s Boys’ Band and the Irish Pipers’ Band.

“Maiya-Wamba” Rhymes with Rhumba

At the opening of the Y.C.W. Training Centre at Cheltenham on Sunday there was some variety among the crowd in the pronouncement of the name, “Maiya Wamba.” According to Dr. Herman Nekes, P.S.M., the missionary philologist and authority on aboriginal linguistics, who suggested the name, the closest approximation to the native inflection would rhyme with “rhumba.” The word “Maiya” (rhymes with “high-ya”) means “house” and occurs substantially in all Australian native languages, while “Wamba,” which means “men,” is peculiar to the north-west tribes of the Yaora (Broome) and the Njol-Njol (Beagle Bay). The combination, therefore, means “House of Men.”

THE ARCHBISHOP’S BIRTHDAY

“Looking Back and Looking Forward”

Acknowledging birthday greetings at “Maiya-Wamba” on Sunday, his Grace the Archbishop said: “! will always endeavour to keep in touch with young people. After all, I am not as old as I might be. In a letter I received some time ago from South Australia, the writer told me he was not an old man, though he was 84. This is the right way, 1 think, to look at life, looking back and looking forward.”

SOURCE

Power House Of Christian Youth (Advocate, Wednesday 8 March 1944, page 7) (Trove)

130 Priests Attend Y.C.W. Conference

Role of Clergy and Laity in Catholic Action Discussed

Archbishops Mannix, Simonds, Tweedy at Sessions

THE Y.C.W. is a movement with vision — the vision of an enthusiastic Catholic youth leading the youth of Australia to the cause, of Christ the King,” said His Grace the Coadjutor-Archbishop of Melbourne, Most Rev. J. D. Simonds, D.D., Ph.D., in an important address on the Young Christian Workers to members of the Hierarchy and clergy at a Y.C.W. conference last week. Archbishop Simonds is the Episcopal chairman of the movement. Represented at the conference, besides the four Victorian dioceses, were the dioceses of Maitland, Wilcannia-Forbes, Wagga Wagga (N.S.W.), Toowoomba, Townsville (Queensland), Adelaide, Port Augusta (South Australia), Hobart (Tasmania) and Perth (WA).

HOLY SPIRIT BROODING ANEW

“The rising tide of paganism,” continued his Grace, “is not destined to engulf the Church of God, for we can see that the Holy Spirit is already brooding anew over the modern chaos to produce a new human world. The most significant inspiration of the Divine Spirit in our days is that by which He has reawakened in the Church the consciousness that the apostolate of Christ’s Kingdom is not a reserved occupation of the clergy, but is the normal radiation of Christian life by every member of the Body of Christ. The Y.C.W. is youth’s response to that awakening.

“It is an authentic movement of Catholic Action. It has merited many striking eulogies from Pope Pius XI., who, among other things, did not hesitate to say: ‘We have given the definition of Catholic Action and that definition has been perfectly interpreted by the Young Christian Workers.’

“To organise a similar apostolate amongst Australian youth is our high purpose and privilege. I am sure you feel with me that your presence here to-day is destined to become historic, for you are helping to enkindle an apostolic flame in the minds and hearts of young Australians, that will undoubtedly be glowing with its brightest intensity in future years that we shall not live to see.

PRIEST IN CATHOLIC ACTION

“The part which the priest has to play in Catholic Action is a very important one, but, at the same time, it is a delicately adjusted role. Pope Pius XI. applied to the chaplains, or ecclesiastical assistants of Catholic Action, the words of the Psalmist: “in manibus tuis sortes meae.” That is the. reason why this conference has been convoked, for I realise that the fate of the Y.C.W. in Australia in its initial stages will be largely in the hands of the clergy. In outlining the role of the priests, the Pope said: ‘The ecclesiastical assistants should be the soul of the associations, the sources of energy, the inspirers of the apostolate, the representatives of episcopal authority.’ These are, of course, normal priestly activities. But the Holy Father was careful to add that the direction of the responsibility of the associations must be left to the” laity. As ministers of Christ and dispensers of the mysteries of God your function will be to form the leaders and members of the Y.C.W. in a thoroughly Catholic spirit, and to give general guidance to the technique of the apostolate according to the directions of the Hierarchy. But the work of the apotolate and the management of their groups are the responsibility of the youth themselves.

LAYMAN’S RIGHT.

“The spiritual formation of the leaders and members is by far your most important work. It is therefore fundamentally important that every ecclesiastical assistant should have clear ideas upon the nature of the lay apostolate, and its relation to the Mystical Body of Christ. The call to Catholic Action is not just a new technique to meet present difficulties by adding lay curates to the clergy because of deficiencies in their ranks. Catholic Action is essential to the very life of the Church. The laity’s right to participate in the apostolate has existed from the beginning, but its importance and its responsibilities are being revealed in a fresh light in modern times. It is a direct consequence of their membership in the Mystical Body of Christ; and the authentic sign of this right is the indelible sacramental character impressed on their souls in the Sacraments of Baptism and Confirmation. Though all the sacraments confer sanctifying grace by which, in St. Peter’s thrilling words, we become partakers of the Divine Nature, three of the sacraments imprint on the soul an indelible character. According to St. Thomas’ beautiful teaching, this character received in the sacraments is actually the character of Christ, or as the word implies, an express image of the beautiful soul of Christ our High Priest, indelibly impressed on the soul. Its triple form indicates the member’s rank in the Mystical Body, and the degree in which he has been admitted to share in the priesthood of the Divine High Priest. “While, therefore, sanctifying grace incorporates us into the Divine Life of Christ, the sacramental character is the seal of our incorporation into the powers of Christ, in particular his priestly powers. This participation in Christ’s priesthood by sacramental character is not a mere passive one. It enables the baptised member to become a co-offerer of the Eucharistic Sacrifice, directly and personally. It confers on the confirmed member the right and the duty of teaching, admonishing and strengthening others in their duty to God. Whilst through the character of Holy Orders the ordained priest becomes so closely identified with Christ that he is able to offer the Eucharistic Sacrifice and confer the sacraments in the person of the Divine Redeemer. Confirmation is therefore the sacrament of Catholic Action; indeed, St. Thomas does not hesitate to call it a quasi ordination. It does not, of course, incorporate the recipient into the administrative and teaching authority of the Hierarchy, but it entitles him to be formally invited to assist in the apostolate. So when he receives this commission he acquires no new rights beyond those already given by the character of Baptism and Confirmation.

KNOWLEDGE AND LOVE OF CHRIST

“It will be your chief function to inspire your leaders with’ a profound realisation of their dignity as members of the Mystical Body, and to fire them with an enthusiasm for Christ their Leader, and for His holy cause in which they have a personally responsible interest. They must know their Leader intimately, for to know Him is to love Him. Therefore, the prayerful study of the Gospel, which puts before them the fascinating personality of Christ, and which teaches them His spirit and His standards of judgment and action, is an integral part of the formation of Y.C.W. leaders. But since the Christian priesthood has two great functions, the apostolate for souls and the liturgical worship of God, it follows that those who are called to share in the apostolate must also actively share in the liturgical worship and prayers of the Church. Both Pius X and Pius XI insisted that the formation of the leaders will not be complete until they have acquired an intense supernatural spirit, that must be drawn from its ‘foremost and indispensable fount, which is liturgical – worship.’ It is also important, of course, that as they are being made more vividly conscious of their incorporation into the Church’s apostolate and worship, they should also grow in loving appreciation of the unique relation which the Blessed Mother bears to the Head and the members of the Mystical Body, and the providential part that she exercises -in the apostolate as the Mother of Divine Grace.

TRAINING CENTRE

“This whole formation will require long and-patient effort, but I am happy to be able to announce that his Grace the Archbishop has already taken a step which is of. prime importance in the task of training. A property with extensive grounds has recently been purchased at Cheltenham, where selected . groups of leaders will be able to spend each weekend in a course of training and direction uncler one of the chaplains. This action of the Archbishop in setting up for the Y.C.W. leaders a novitiate, that will be the powerhouse f spiritual and intellectual energy of the movement, is destined to have a profound nfluence on the future of its apostolate.

SPECIAL FIELD OF APOSTOLATE

“Side by side with the spiritual formation of the militants goes your responsibility f general guidance in the technique of the apostolate according to the directions of the hierarchy. The special field of the apostolate of the Y.C.W. is that vast mass of Australian youth whose lives are, for the most part, cast in an environment that is either coldly indifferent or actively hostile to the Christian spirit. The Y.C.W. is not just another defensive club that aims at segregating its members and sheltering them from the corrosive influence of their environment. It is a militant and apostolic movement that is determined to take the offensive by penetrating into the environment of the workers, and impregnating its movements and activities with the spirit of Christ.

“Its organisation is first of all developed on parochial lines, for the parish is the canonical unit of spiritual life. But when its spirit has been captured by leaders and groups, it will then grow by division, in order to regroup itself into specialised movements. These will bring the apostolate into the special environments peculiar to groups of workers in factories, workshops or professions. Particular groupings according to common interests or environments form an essential part of Catholic Action and this is the next big development of th6 Y.C.W. which must be organised. But the Holy See has strongly insisted that the specialised movements must always retain a unity, for this is indispensable to Catholic Action. The Y.C.W. will fulfil this function of unity for all the future specialised movements of youth that will develop according to the different industrial or professional environments.

TO WHOM OUR LAND WAS FIRST DEDICATED

“We have opened this conference with the celebration of the Holy Sacrifice in honour of the Holy Spirit, to Whom this fair land of ours was first dedicated as the Southern Land of the Holy Ghost. Only the irresistible power of the Divine Spirit can rechristianise the mass of Australian youth, and we wish to offer the Y.C.W. to the Holy Spirit as a willing instrument in that gigantic task. You who generously offer to co-operate in that work of the Holy Ghost must bring to it an enthusiastic optimism that springs from profound confidence in the power of the Holy Spirit and the efficacy of prayer and work in His Name.

“Each morning we ascend the altar in those conditions of tranquillity and spiritual security that belong to the priesthood. It is especially in those moments of grace that we must have compassionate thought for that vast mass “of Australian youth which the voracious industrial machine drags each morning into its inhuman vortex, and after a day of soulless service to the machine is cast out again each evening into homes or places of amusement from which the spirit of Christ has been mostly excluded. More than once the great Heart of our Divine Master was so moved to. compassion at the sight of a crowd fainting with physical hunger, that He gave them miraculous bread. He is surely more deeply moved at the sight of the spiritually starving youth of to-day, and even more anxious to multiply through, the hands of His modern apostles the spiritual bread that endureth unto life everlasting.’ “During the present year the Episcopal Committee for Catholic Action requested me to undertake the direction of the Young Christian Workers’ Movement, which promises to develop into one of the most fruitful activities of the lay apostolate. It was thought fitting that the first conference called to organise the movement on national lines should be a conference of members of the Hierarchy and clergy, whose duty it will be to guide the beginnings of this important movement. I have therefore profound pleasure in bidding you a cordial welcome to the conference, and I express my sincere gratitude for your presence.”

SOURCE

130 Priests Attend Y.C.W. Conference (Advocate, Thursday 28 October 1943, page 7) (Trove)

Archbishop Beovich, Episcopal Chairman of YCS

THE first combined function of the Young Catholic Students’ Movement in Melbourne took place on the 14th inst, when nearly 200 leaders of the movement gathered at “Tay Creggan.”

They came from practically every one of the boys’ and girls’ colleges in the diocese. The rally was given additional prestige and significance by the presence of four members of the Episcopacy—the Archbishop of Melbourne (Most Rev. D. Mannix, D.D.), the Archbishop of Sydney (Most Rev. N. Gilroy, D.D.), the Archbishop of Adelaide (Most Rev. M. Beovich, D.D.),and the Bishop of Toowoomba (Most Rev. B. Roper, D.D.).

These members of the Bishops’ Committee on Education were holding a conference in Melbourne, and generously accepted the invitation to be present at the Y.C.S. gathering.

It was announced during the afternoon that the Bishops’ Committee on Catholic Action had asked Archbishop Beovich to become the Episcopal Chairman of the Students’ Movement, and that he had generously undertaken to guide the destinies of this youthful organisation.

He is the first member of the Hierarchy to assume this active leadership of a specialised Catholic Action Movement following the example of Bishop Henschke in the National Catholic Rural Movement, Bishop Gleeson in the National Catholic Girls’ Movement, and Archbishop Mannix in the National Christian Workers’ Movement.

SOURCE

Archbishop Beovich, Episcopal Chairman of YCS (Southern Cross, Friday 30 October 1942, page 3) / Trove